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to helman and nimruz province. very complex dynamic environment that we were operating in but before i begin it talk to you about the operational picture, i just want to give you a snapshot of afghanistan. when we got there i want to set the frame here so you understand what we're dealing with. afghanistan ranged 180th out of 1 86 on the world bank list of developed countries. 20 percent of the babies won't reach their first year of life. there is a 44 year life span for your average citizen. it has a less than 20 percent literacy rate and girls in afghanistan will marry by the time they are 15 and will likely birth their second child by the time they are 20. so this is the long-term effects of violence and civil wars within a failed state by every measure. the marines who are currently still in southwest afghanistan, they are surrounded by very conservative culture. in 2010, this is not true now but narco trafficking and helman province alone was the fourth largest trafficker of heroin in the world. the taliban controlled the region and this is the environment that the marines ca
the endangered species act, it is not obeying the environment of national policycy act. john: i assumed theseeople mean well, they are not evil. >> they mean well, but their priorities are all about the species and nothing about the individual landowners who are simply trying to earn a living on their land. this is an agency that has forgotten who they serve. they should be serving the people that live on the land as well. people and the animals can coexist and they can cooperate to do this, but when you have the heavy hand of the federal governme threatening people of jail time and hugeines, if you don't do this, you will have all sorts of trouble. it creates disincentives because landowners do not want to help endangered species act if that is essential going to be an economic death sentence for them. john: hence the phrase shoot, shovel, and shut up. >> that is the trifecta that happens on some land. some people do it legally, cuing down trees before they get old engh to be habitat for the woodpeckers. it is not goodor the woodpecker, not good for the land, it is not good for the eco
violence. all of your efforts. this started. eleven have always. some kind of environment. this case. many of them -- >> okay. first question, yes. a lot did actually have a lot of spin-off benefits. that is a lemon scent. because these laws were passed and there was such a nationwide applaud that the government began -- the parliament became open to the other laws. there we took the other laws that got past because of this one. and also, the issue is so tabooed, even the sexual assault and rape, and these issues are also so tabooed that now people are starting to even the president and prime master and the speeches of the anti sexual-harassment law. okay. now the world is getting very popular. so now it is almost creating a space where even in cestus coming out of the space. so rather than saying incest was it would not to run television a lot of sexual violence and sexual assault and rape is also coming, which is heated. fine. other terms. for example, rape, we do not have that yet. but we are coming close. when is that the case of the new york. we had it outside the un system. this big
to encouraging stewardship of the environment, land conservation, watershed protection and eliminating harmful chemicals. additional funding provided by: the colcom foundation. the wallace genetic foundation the e. rhodes and leona b. carpenter foundation. and by the charles a. frueauff foundation. this week on "to the contrary," first, environmental racism. what it is and does it exist? then, behind the headlines: poison in your sofa, called flame retardants. hello, i'm bonnie erbe. welcome to to the contrary, a discussion of news and social trends from diverse perspectives. up first, the climate justice gap. climate change may be a global problem, but the naacp reports it disproportionately affects women, people of color and lower income communities. that's why the naacp launched the climate justice initiative. >> communities of color tend to have these pre-existing vulnerabilities so that somehow when a disaster happens, there's communities that have you know poor housing stock or are under insured or are politically marginalized and all of those factors combine to make a greater vulnerabil
out in this pleasant and quiet environment and you might see butter nice, and dandelion and is squirrels hundred dollaring for their next meal and buena vista park is 88 >> i want to learn more about it. >> social networking and e-mail. >> i want to know how to use it. ♪ ♪ ♪ >> divisional divide is a divide between those with access to use digital tools and those who don't. >> with young people, having computers and i just don't know. they're doing it fast. so, i want to know. >> not knowing how to navigate the internet or at a loss of what to do. >> we don't have a computer. >> we're a nonprofit that unites organizations and volunteers to transform lies through literacy. our big problem right now is the broadband opportunity program. a federally funded project through the department of aging. so, we're working in 26 locations. our volunteers are trained to be tutors and trainers, offering everything from basic classes all the way to genealogy and job search. >> to me computers, knowing how to use it. >> i think it's really important to everybody and possibly espec
't also happen with the projects. they've taken a lot of time to benefit the environment and it will be a benefit to the neighborhood and to the neighbors with the view of their house. i really think this is a great design for a family house their maintaining what's there and they're asking for the variance to be maintained. i really support that project. thank you very much >> thank you any other public comments? please step forward >> good evening maybe i'm the last one we can all go home arrest i'm frank morris. my family as lived in this area for over 70 years. i've lived they're there for 3 seven years. tights real a shame we're here at this point. we all want our neighbors to get what they need but not as an expense to the neighborhood. first one was the variance that took the two parking spaces in their driveway sometimes there's 3 cars in that driveway. they were allowed to take the garage space and make that that an apartment. the second thing is the variance allows the building to be the highest densest on the block. i have 2 thousand square foot on exactly 4
consider very severe environments in case of a disaster which personally i think that's how we train and probably most of your environments. maybe you want to start from a place of more limitations rather than less and one of them is not doing that kind of coordination via cell phone. again, i think this was, last year there was a table top, this is the first time we're actually doing a drill. there's reason for growth and as bijon said, maybe next year we are meshing xhapld and control so command and control is done over the exercise com link and keeping it separate. i think the point is well taken that the recommendation i made, i think we can introduce more rigor into the execution of the com drills next year. >> any other questions? panelists, thank you very much, i appreciate it. let's give them a big round of applause. (applause). >> something that took place yesterday was our medical exchange. rob is going to give you a summary of how that went and at the same time we're going to bring up some additional panelists who will give us their perspective. >> so we're going to do a
together to have one vision and improve the physical environment and with that said supervisor kim i will turn it back to you. >> thank you chair and i do want to acknowledge we have a enlighten board of supervisors in terms of our understanding of pedestrian safety, and i think a lot of that also is due to a lot of activists and community members who made this a priority issue to educate government and members of the community on this issue and of course they have been impacted on this as well and hopefully through the hearings we can push and encourage for better working -- a better coordination amongst a variety of departments and this sits in a lot of different purviews so again i want to invite you up and chaired the task force and a member of the sf mta. thank you for being here. >> thank you supervisors. i am deputy of planning for the sf mta also the transportation task force, co-chair with dhp. i'm going to give you a quick overview of the strategy and then what we're going to be talking about in the hearing so you can hear from the various departments on what they have
response at the local level, and then herding all the cats that are in this pretty complex environment and trying to get them moving in a common direction. >> general baldwin? >> first, i'm very, very encouraged at the direction the department of defense has taken in changing the way that we do support the civil authorities. and the evolution, the problem that came out of the l.a. riots that were highlighted during hurricane katrina, we had two milltrix out there, the active force and responding. with changes in the law and changes in focus and direction we're starting to fix a lot of that and come together as one joint team to be able to better serve the people here in the state of california and the rest the nation in times of disaster. but there is work that needs to be done. first, we need to find a way that we can share capabilities that are resident within each of our organizations. as the commander of the army national guard you would think i know what forces are available in the army reserve in california. but i don't. i don't even know who their general officers are. i have no
with the environment in which i lived as a child. and i think i was right about this. ten years ago, in the fall of 1998, i gave birth to a child. i became a cancer patient at 20 and a mother at the brink of 40, which i know isn't how most people's lives are ordered, but that's how mine worked out. i am betting that in between my children's adult lives and my own, an environmental human rights movement will arise. it's one whose seeds have already been sown. i am betting that my children, and the generation of children that they are a part, will by the time they are my age -- they'll consider it unthinkable to allow cancer-causing chemicals to freely circulate in our economy. they will find it unthinkable to assume an attitude of silence and willful ignorance about our ecology. >> sandra steingraber wouldn't stay silent. today she is at the very heart of the environmental human rights movement that she prophesied. she's fighting to identify and eliminate carcinogens in our air, water and food, and to stop fracking, that controversial extraction of natural gas from deep beneath the earth. she is
, people's experiences in working in international environments to help promote humanitarian missions. fleet week got involved with a humanitarian mission back in october in the earthquake in van, turkey. there's a heavy kurdish in san francisco and the ... better recover from their event and how to better prepare in the future from the katz traufk event that had taken place would not occur. we got a phone call at the fleet week association to ask if we could help bring together some resources and leet a fact-finding mission and we did that. one of our panelists is up here, second from your left, rob dudgeon, he's with the department of emergency management and he's the director of emergency services. rob's organization has been instrumental in creating the program that we have from back in 2010 all the way through to today and i know in the future we're already talking about putting together a hot wash of everything we've learned through 2012's fleet week. so rob is going to talk about the van, turkey mission. from turkey we have rear admiral guereva he has more than 14 years se
streaming and research on news activism and environment. and based in washington d.c. at the national endowment for democracy. and over red light areas, released by oxford and forgotten cases. and in japanese have become popular among young pakistani women. and the doctorate working at the university of minnesota. please join in welcoming today's guest dr. fouzia saeed. [applause] >> very nice to be here and i look forward to the next hour of engagement with you. if you want to turn this off you can, at least up to the limit. i am going to tell you a story today and the stories in the context of pakistan, about one woman and also celebration of women in pakistan but it resonates universally, goes across borders. this is about a legislation we got in pakistan against sexual harassment. we got these laws passed in 2010 and i will tell you why these laws are so important for us. one reason was after years of militancy women were being pushed back in the last decade and a half conlan this was the first come back, the first assertion from the side of women to regain public space or space i
for an earthquake. there's a variety of dod resources that cal fire can provide in a statewide environment. i think the biggest thing for me, there's several scenarios that are challenging us, one of which and one of our fears, and it's been in the newspaper so it's not a secret, but one of the things that scares me as well is the united states is not really experienced what i would call a global disaster yet. we have had disasters, i was in katrina on an urban search and rescue team, i've been in pretty much all major engagements as far as wild land fires in california, but if you look at a global disaster perspective where you have a hundred thousand victims like a tsunami or a large scale event, we have yet to experience that in this nation. i think the agreements we have here today and the relationships we develop today are going to be key to mitigate that. the other scenario that we are concerned with is a coordinated aerial incendiary attack by al qaeda. one of the things we've seen already in the european union is suspect of al qaeda starting fires in the eu if that happened in californi
of making everything a process like public art would be really challenging in an environment like san francisco. so, i think every city is different. san francisco would be drastically affected if we adopted something that stringent. >> i just wanted to speak to -- a little bit to [speaker not understood] speaking about the vancouver program. and i do have some experience with that. ways also a coordinator of murals. and one of the benefits of having a process, whether that's a permit, whether there's a fee attached to that, whether there's a committee or if it simply goes through a process where different departments of the city can have input. for example, in vancouver and really the vancouver graffiti management mural program is almost identical to what tyra is talking about doing here. it's similar to public art murals, but similar in scope. when we were doing our murals, almost 200 of them, there was no permit in place, but there was a selection process. and, so, if that was the heritage property, that had to go to heritage. and they had to decide whether or not that building ha
. 2008 - 11 e which seas the impacts on the environment which could result from implementation. staff is not here today to respond to comments such comments will be responded in writing which will respond to ail comments during the public comment period and this is not a hearing to disapprove or approve the project. comments today should be directed for the adequacy of the project >> commenters should state their name and address so thel they can have a copy of the projects comments. we'll take any comments from the planning commission and the public comment extended to the april 29, '96. since this is a local san francisco project this is the only draft. i recommend that the public hearing be opened. okay opening it up to public comment. tim kennedy. >> hello, i'm timmy live on 41 avenue. i'm coming here today because i'm a certified person. my prim certain is not with the underground water. my prim certain is with the pipeline location. and particle with the south sunset well location. if the eir the well, is located on 40 and the pipeline will make a 90 degree it goes up one bloc
is above sea level rise and certainly when we talk about the environment. as the title of this panel says, along green view. it is absolutely about how the complexities of human decision making, human settlement, individual ambition, always contradictory emotions of people have shape not only what the environment is, we impact it and give them access. but how we think of it to my we formulate the idea of the wild and now often that is based on these often very self-serving tropes that we invented. so the environment is about history, human action. and in this but what i tried to do is to show how some of those crosscurrents work. he said sell thing boils down to the final decisive battle but against the indians to have been an extremely aggressive northern plains tribe who had been the ones first to master horses and had arranged absolutely right through the yellowstone country hunting in the fire all, for example. once there were dealt with the exploration could continue, but one last cautionary note goes back to the question of prison. i think it is very easy when people look at this bo
in these type of environments and we were able to really take those and learn more about each other for future responses. we were able to take and provide a taylored response package to better serve the customer. again, we don't want to go in with a full package that the state or civil environments aren't really asking for, we want to be sure it's taylored appropriately and it's responsive and timely. we also had the humanitarian assistance coordination center. that's the place we were able to take the non-governmental agencies and the hoetion nation international agencies and have them interacting and coordinating with the military folks so that we were able to provide an understanding of how we all work together. so if you want additional information, if you want to talk to captain napalitano, he is the commanding officer for the expeditionary training group, and he is the -- in charge of the people that train and certify that crisis response adaptive force package. his folks also put together the different events for this, for the exercise. the apan provides us an opportunity to be able
the policy environment the so conducive to dealing with the key issues between the u.s. and mexico. the immigration bill is hot and heavy, front and center. marco rubio did ginsburg in espagnole. he had five sunday shows, to talk about immigration. the gang of eight is hard at work on that. guns, u.s.-mexico relations. outink the guns may come not quite as favorable to mexico's longstanding positions as the immigration debate might. i would take a 14 two. we will be in good shape. the third is trade. mexico, the united states, now japan, canada, are linked in the trans-pacific partnership talks. talks with many of our key trading allies across the pacific. many of us view it as a chance to help bring nafta into the 21st century. the three are very much on the u.s. agenda. it shows great forward progress. welcome all of you to what promises to be a truly fascinating session. be second reason this will terrific is because of our panelists. i will say little bit more about the ambassador of mexico. doris meissner, who i served with in the clinton administration. she is one of our grea
access to them in our modern media environment it's so fractured that people are targeting small niches. how do i get young males or middle aged women or black people, and unfortunately i think some media outlets decided to use pledge dirks stereo type, even close to racism to draw in an audience and keep the audience on their platform rather than going to others. so what i try to do in this book, i try to explore that a little bit. try toy describe why that is happening and help people diffuse these things so they can recognize it when they seive it on fox news channel, on msnby, on the drudge report, they have a sense of what is going on, and they're made more media literate and they can response in a way that makes sense. >> host: eric deegans is our guest. the book "race-baiter." the numbers are on the screen. >> host: you can also contact m-deegans by social media. our >> mr. deegans, you used the term coded language. what does that mean? >> guest: well, there's lot of ways -- because i say one of the great successes of the civil rights movement is that we have reached the point wh
all have to work on it. >> that problem he said is damage to the environment, both long term and immediate. nowhere is it more pressing than china. in city after city, the delegation saw firsthand the air pollution program that evokes images of los angeles in the 1960s and '70s. here wearing a mask outdoors is a fashion statement. global wind patterns is not just a threat to the chinese. >> we feel the impact of it eventually. i think there are opportunities for both sides to collaborate. >> in meetings with chinese officials, the governor found out what works. from tail pipe exhaust laws to air quality districts. >> they know our programs well. they have been studying. >> that may help explain the agreements on the visit that brown signed with chinese officials. four agreements in all. >> china has the largest economic body and largest energy consumers and largest audio consumers and emitters. so we have a lot of opportunities in the future. >> china's challenges are not a lack of political energy as they are the source of the physical energy. coal. railroad cars full of coa
side by side, it's not an issue. it's helped the neighborhood, created more of a safe environment. i have not felt better walking down mission and 6 street because of the prevalence of the medical cannabis in that community. i ask you to please reject these restrictions. it's the wrong venue. this commission as well as any other body repeated with our policy makers go back to the drawing board. >> you are out of your time. >> sorry. i will write a letter. any other speakers whom i haven't called. >> my name is jonelle. we were here last year at the same time opposed the 3 cannabis clubs that did open. mission organic has opened and the police have been called numerous times. their patients feel they have the right to sit inside of a car and smoke the cannabis and drive away. there have also been, they walk around the corner where they go and smoke their pot because they feel they have the right to do so. no, you don't. you have a right to be a good citizen. you don't have a right to cause additional problems in this area. we are not afraid of medical cannabis. i understand the needs
am determined to facilitate the economic environment and raise the tax rate. based on provision, comprehensive tax reform act. and japan's own entitlement reform to put the government expenditure in check. previously the g 20 meetings. together with other member nations, we aim the primary balance to fiscal the -- fiscal year 2015 and from 2010 and we also keeping family balance, by 2020. we are going to publish medium-term fiscal plans around the middle of this year. the second interest-rate hike is avoidable. economics should take a deep root for an economy to see sustainable growth. finally let me say only a few words about what kind of country japan not to be. japan should be a place where effort, japan must be a place where thinkers, risktakers can be given opportunities not just once but many times. prime minister presents a chance for a second coming in japan. japan must be a place where the sense continues. japan must be a place for innovation. japan is on the cutting edge of new medical technology. the nobel prize winner said japan is a country that is a bonus to bringi
. it was a target, soft target, rich environment and it's unlikely that this could have been stopped. but tell you what, i know london is preparing for their marathon of the they learned a lot of lessons. we're going to convey those lessons to them. people need to be aware. they need to see and be aware of their surroundings at all times. we live as the former mayor and ambassador flint said, we live in a different time and we are in a -- we are from a proud country and we have nothing to be ashamed of. it's these kids who somehow went down a track that we don't know why, but i'm sure we'll find out. >> neil: we will. thank you, scott brown. good seeing you. all right. into his point about -- i think it's closing in on $20 million raised by business using supercomputing and mobile technology over our secure network, verizon innovators are building a world of medical treatment data in the cloud. so doctors can make a more informed diagnosis from anywhere, in seconds rather than months. because the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger solutions. powerful answers. verizon. has oats that can
you brought staples to the world it a promising economic environment and guys like you invest through that . work on a hunch that what you have got is a good idea and now the fear is that business types who are retisent to commit capitol beyond buying back stocks will have an added worry like terror and it is it going to add to their skittishness; what do you think of that? >> no, i don't think so, neil. i think there is caution around . obama care and proposed higher taxes have a fall bigger bearing on slowing people down if anything. flankly our company - frankly our company is seeing good resultings. terrorism affects him. we have a store two blockings away from the scene of the original crime, and there, our store was closed several days and even today, foot trarving is a fraction of what it had been. we closed boston stores for -- and i think it will be a while before foot traffic will get there. it did after sars and other tragedies. they have significant economic impact . bostonians are strong in this sense and president obama is right. we'll get back there faster. the last thi
to keep the city clean and a partner with public works and department of environment and ecology. on may 4 we are joining the san francisco conservation core, a neighborhood association, enterprise for high school students to celebrate the trails completed in the park and made possible by california proposition 84 park fundamentalling. the day will start at eight amand ribbon celebration at 11 p.m. and for more information go to our website. line up was announced yesterday for the event and it's jam packed including paul mc cartly, the red hot chilly peppers and commissioner low -- >> i am waiting for hall and oats. >> guess what? they will be there. willy nelson. i know commissioner you're a big fan of jer rassic -- >> [inaudible] >> phoenix will also be playing. tickets go on sale today at noon. you can log on to our website for more information. we had a big wind storm last week and i wanted to update the commissioners. we did lose 26 of our trees in our park system. it was actually pretty surprising. the park with the most trees down was harding park with 10 trees down. all
care and private medical decisions should occur in an environment that is safe and free of coercion. planned parenthood is a important part of many san francisco an's lives and often the only healthcare that many regularly received. patients are supporters and and the doctors that serve. and on the election campaigns. >> next speaker, please. >> hi, my name is jamie glen and i represent the 40 days for life in san francisco, and i want to thank you for having this legislation and for meeting with us last week. and as i shared with you before, we are deeply concerned about reports of harassment and intimidation, my husband and i moved here six months ago so i am unfamiliar with the long history, that is described and i have small children myself and so i am not available for every hour of sxwis so i can attest to whatever and while i am doing all of those other moments and i think that if i take a step back and regardless of all of that, i think that it is important to realize that both sides here may are may not have an agenda. that obviously the prolife that life begins at concepti
of exchanges going on right now. forward to a post 2013 environment, to you believe these multibillion-dollar payments will continue regardless of their being an american presence or nato troop presence in afghanistan? maintaineve we need to a constructive and effective relationship with pakistan. we need to recognize the real threat that pakistan has inside of its own borders. from my perspective we have to do whatever it takes to ensure that our national vital interests is protected. >> one of the things i am always looking into that aid is whether or not it does serve the military. you are saying we need to do whatever it takes to continue that relationship. are you saying that payments of that size and nature are going to be what is required in the long run? >> i believe it is in our best interest to continue to develop the pakistani army in ensuring that they can effectively deal issues in their borders. i cannot tell you that every program we have in place is one we ought to assisting in the future. that is not something i paying particular attention to in my current duties. i am
in an outside environment. but they are devastating. they do the job. the element of surprise is on the side of law enforcement. the suspect doesn't know they are coming. they are completely disorienting and it usually covers whatever action you are trying to do. want to come in with weapons drawn, b night vision, you control the situation. it takes a while to recover from one. you usually lose your hearing. jahar sinayev, 19 years old. this is the suspect at the center of all this attention tonight. there is his picture. this started when we saw the first two images. this brother duo. both suspects yesterday. spent his early childhood in the russian caucasus region near chechnya. came to the united states ten years ago. this next fact is something that didn't receive a lot of traction today. he became a naturalized citizen on september 11 of 2012. he was currently enrolled at the university, u-mass dartmouth. he was a wrestler growing up in school in cambridge. cannot tell you how many witnesses told journalists today -- kind, approachable, great kid, something must have gone wrong. this wa
and giving the military a chance to work with the civilian authority in a non-crisis environment so that when they have to do it anywhere in the world, they've got one extra training day. that's the way we look at it, it's all one extra training day. you add all that up, we have a lot better chance when we need it. with that, i'm going to bring up dejon and take over the panel and i'll talk to you shortly. >> thank you, rob. the panelists we have represent a broad group of participants, some of them participated themselves and some of them had individuals in their organizations participate. and i want them to start with an introduction of who they are, a little bit about their own background, so you understand the lens they were looking through when they were providing some of their answers today. starting with our 3 panelists that were part of our command and control exercise then we'll hear from our 3 panelists that were in our communications drill. >> lieutenant commander mike kress, operations officer at naval beach group 1, i was a coach during the exercise. we supported the exercise
. they are trusted environments within other industry groupings. certainly companies do not want to share competitive information that would lead to antitrust issues. there are some restrictions bidirectionally between the government, which has classified information, and financial institutions. there has to be a trust relationship improved their. there are some areas where the government simply cannot share information with the banks and the financial sector may not share certain information with the government if it runs afoul of privacy concerns or civil liberties or proprietary financial information, etc. , has there been an attack on the air traffic control system that has stopped traffic? >> no. but that is something we have to worry about. there are different levels and there would be different reasons for attacks. what is the reason? is the reason to bring down an aircraft, which could be a terrorist type thing come a which as we were discussing in the other room is horrific and a big catastrophe and gets a lot of attention. more importantly, if we cripple the air traffic control system, if t
they have total visual environment, they are trying to evacuate any residents in the area from the neighborhood, and as was noted, now they went to move, the flash-bangs, be methodical. the one thing, they're not certain but they're operating under the assumption there are explosives in that yard. >> you know, i think one of the best examples for your viewers, i'm sure many of them saw "zero dark thirty." there was an initial assault phase, helicopters crashing in and all, then it seemed like minutes went by as people then started deliberately moving through and that's kind of a parallel to what you're going to see happen here tonight. but i think within a few hours of darkness, this could be favorably resolved. >> one of our producers is near the scene. lawrence, what are you seeing and hearing? >> well, i'm at washburn and chester streets, which is about a block from franklin street, where i'm told from a boston police source they have a suspect cornered in the backyard of a home. i'm also told that they're using flash-bangs to try to get him out. the number one priority for
be devastating effect on south korea and the seoul and environ that will be the result? do we hae a docrine that says instead of there would be assured destruction? for north korea if they were to carry out such an attack? >> our plans here are solid. they get updated continuously, because we have capability improvement. but make no mistake about it, we would be all in with the air power and the land forces. ewith would counter by invading north korea. we would go to the jugular as quickly as we can. with airpower, where the seat of power is and systematically take the rime down once and for all. if the invation it would take police and encouner the invation first and simultaneously while we are doing that, we'd gawk up on him in terms of the commander and central system, artillery and logistical infrastructure and take regime down. >> lou: are you still confident a conflict can be avoided? >> guest: yeah, i am. as i said went to know for sure but i think he will probablfire a missile. and i suspect the exercises are about to end at theend of month. that should bring the chanter to a close.
tricks of the trade, right up that gorgeous sleeve of hers. alaska is a very extreme environment. >> 30 foot seas, hurricane force winds. we go in and it's really bad situations, and we always pull it off. >> we hit the water. game on. go. go. get it on. >> under water, go. >> the rope why we all do this job is to save lives. >> a lot of the times the coast guard comes before family. >> when he's out flying, i do pray. >> everything i throw at it, we do. fall is final here. and for every season there's a reason to watch "wake up with al" on the weather channel. the front is going to move through and it's going to change the temperature. >> you just can't beat this kind of weather. >> everything you need to know, first thing. >> here's the big picture. >> we're kind of like a killer app in the morning. >> wake up with us. 78 hoo-hoo. hoo-hoo...hoo-hoo. o-hoo hoo. sir... i'll get it together i promise... heeheehee. jimmy: ronny, how happy are folks who save hundreds of dollars switching to geico? ronny:i'd say happier than the pillsbury doughboy on his way to a baking convention. get happ
for two senators to reach a deal. but that is sort of the way it has, that the environment now down there. is that deal of theirs between the two of them something that is going move forward as legislation? that will be taken seriously by both parties? >> i think it will be taken seriously. i don't know if it wll pass or not. we should be focusing on prosecuting and punishing and preventing violent criminals. and we should be safeguarding the constitutional rights of law-abiding citizens. all of us were horrified by what happened at sandyhook. i have two children at home and to parent could see chirp senselessly murdered and not be anything but speechless and just taken aback at the depravity and the hor are of it. but it's sad so many politicians are trying to take advantage of the tragedy not to take legislation to target violent criminals but working to take away the second amendment right to keep an bear arms of the law abiding peaceful citizens. let me tell you something interestingost people don't know -- >> lou: senator, could i to this. take this opportunity to go to break very qu
's going to be a lot of challenges running events in these open environments like a marathon. there's 26 miles, it's going to be very difficult, but there are a the will the of things that event organizers working wi ini law enforcement can do. >> dan, thank you so much. the boston red sox are doing their part to help their hometown heal. how they are bringing a sense of normalcy to the city. we'll head back live to fenway park in a few minutes. >>> welcome back to cnn's conning coverage of the terrorist attacks in boston. the city is beginning to return to normal and we can really get a sense of that at fenway park where the red sox are back in action today. before the first pitch, there was a solemn moment of silence. >> as we think of our 176 adults and children who were injured, including officer richard donahue, won't you join us as we observe a moment of silence, contemplation and prayer and in particular for the 58 who are still hospitalized. thank you. we wish each of you a speedy recovery. >> now let's go back to john berman a the ballpark. i'm wearing a red sox hat. i just want
. they stress no connection to the developments in boston. in this heightened environment and detective, patted rosen, it's curious. >> it done straits what we have known all along. they hate us and want to kill us they just keep coming at you. >> neil: even though there is not apparent link apparently this guy and these two brothers. you would argue the other day you think there are these kinds of cells where the two, three, four, five people all over the place. >> absolutely. they are unified. they are unified t the extent they hate us. they are absolutely bent on killing us. >> neil: is it a group, one was a chechen connection. there their common theme is they hate us. by that theory, they are everywhere. >> they appear to be a lot more than we have thought. it's safe to assume that the 19-year-old, who forgot surveillance cameras existed and boxer the chip the size of the arizona on his shoulder didn't orchestrate this in vacuum. there are too many moving parts to it. >> neil: local authorities say they did but there is no evidence that point to wider participation? >> i disagree with the f
's another power we can use the environment. that is the power of persuasion. here we are lucky as both of us ex-prime ministers, he and i have met a whole bunch0s ceos and they should remember their patriotism and hire more, or pay more to their employees. it is -- for the first time in many years an increasing number of companies are willing to pay more. however, getting rid of denation -- deflation mindset alone cannot hamper long-lasting recovery. we most leave people with expectation to sustainable economic growth. and for the purpose we must have two downside risk. one, inflation without growth. two, interest rate hike without growth. let me understand one by one. let's assume that you now have rising cpi, but you have no pay rise. the economy is that is a bad inflation. people should suffer then. it is right here that the third bazooka should come into play. the third bazooka, if you recall, is a package of growth enhancement policies. i know it's hard to come by. i am not saying we can do very easily. still, it takes us only to look into miller -- into mirror to see who you are and th
environment. [ sniffing ] [ seagulls squawking ] >> pam: he was found hiding in a boat and watertown we carry you are looking at a live picture now in watertown. we are awaiting the start of a news conference. you are looking at the fbi agent who is ahead of the. much relief across the country tonight because no. 2 suspect number two is in custody tonight. as we said no. 2 is now in custody. >> reporter: people are on the streets seem think you'd, it was our pleasure. people cheering and celebrating in the streets of boston. obviously having a moment of relief that at the same time boston police are sending out letters not forget martin richard crystal campbell and officer joe collier were all the people killed in the boston marathon. >> pam: we are about to expand the bomb has been apprehended. the news conference is starting now. >> we are so grateful to be your right now, we parsons sold grateful to bring justice inclosure to buy. to the family's loss love one's or suffered injuries, and two are a police officer and a young man starting his career at mit who lost his life. to the neighbors
that they have total visual environment. they tried to evacuate any residents in the area in the neighborhood. it's been noted, now when to move the flash bang. be methodical. they're not certain, they're not certain but they're operating under the assumption that there are explosives in that house. >> i think one of the best examples for your viewers, i'm sure many of them saw zero dark 30 and there was an initial assault phase, helicopter come in and minutes went by by the time people started moving through. that's a parallel of what you're going to see happen tonight. within a few hours of darkness, this could be favorably resolved. >> one of our producers, lawrence cook is near the scene. what are you seeing? >> we're on washburn. we've been told that they have the suspect cornered in the backyard of a home. i'm also told that they are using flash bangs to try to get him out. the number one priority is for the police as they try to get this suspect out alive. they want to see him go to trial. i'm surprised at the amount of neighbors that have gathered around this area. there's 40 to 50 people
this respect, that watertown is a very, very easy going, very community type of environment. and this community with solidarity and people embracing one another, then dead ghost nothing. residents were frightened and stuck within their homes and didn't have the opportunity to go out and find out except for expressions from people like yourself. >> what is it like to be holed up in your home, unsure if someone is hiding in your basement or backyard. whether somebody is using you as a cover for their attempts to allude authorities. >> i noticed a number of police and military going to homes. >> did they enter your home? >> they did enter my home. >> explain that. what was it like? >> they knocked on the door and explained they were obviously looking for the suspect and with like it check out all of the residence. they checked about 200 different homes. >> right. but specifically your home. >> right. >> how reluctant for to you even open the door? >> not very. because of the situation that happened monday. the citizens of this community embraced the police and the fbi and other members of law enfo
mean, you know, you really -- these are complicated environments and you have to have a feeling for people and the built to deal with people and be trusted. i think at a place like -- you have to be a superb scholar and teacher and well respected. because -- people have to respect you if they come from an academic -- >> you leading the mt talented intellectuals in the world. and they want somebody they can respect as a conversation partner. and i think it's out of th)iá large faculty a couple of thousand people there better be a few who can lead. and my job is to find them. one of my jobs is to pick the talent, give them committee assignments and administrative jobs that would bring out the talent. >> do you have any idea what bart giamatti saw in you? >> i don't know, i was well organized. >> his provost, bilbray national guard, was a mentor of mine and i think bill sort of called me to his attention and it was to bill that i got to know him and got very important assignments even in the university so in may you'll preside over the graduation for the last time. what do you hop
into his environment. "mad money"'s back to school tour returns april 25th. don't miss a second of "mad money." follow, @jimcramer on twitter. send jim an e-mail to mad money@cnbc.com or give us a call at 1-800-74 had 3-cnbc. miss something? head to mad money.cnbc.com. >>> welcome back to a bizarrely "mad money." i have stumbled around the stock market long enough to learn a thing or two. tonight you're getting some of that wisdom from the school of hard knocks. don't you always love it at the beginning of a football game where they say, jim cramer, school of hard knocks? that's what i attended when it came to stocks. you're getting the online version right here, right now. the greatest game, stocks & bonds with its stock certificates and its game board and all the little cool doodads. what would send a stock higher? you keep track. i left the stock market games behind me by the time i got to middle school. my object sessions became sports. i was the second fastest guy in the school forever, so i ran track. and then, of course, girls whose movements were more lucid than even the ranges
town environment of boston. >> you really couldn't believe it. certainly an eerie sight, alex. yesterday the streets of boston should have been teeming with commuters. there should have been tourists. there should have been people outside enjoying the weather. but instead they were hunkered down. they were staying inside, heeding orders that there was a terrorist, potentially on the loose. about 1 million people ordered to stay inside. to lock their doors. boston and its surrounding suburbs were virtually under siege. a lockdown in the suburbs, a shelter in place order for the city. >> we're asking people to shelter in place. in other words to stay indoors with their doors locked, and not to open the door for anyone other than a properly identified law enforcement officer. >> reporter: it was early friday morning when dzhokhar tsarnaev escaped a police shoot-out in watertown. forcing officials to shut down a 20-block radius, and demanding residents stay indoors for their own safety. >> i've just never seen it this way. i mean, even in the latest hours at night it's never this
environment. it is set fire to our living room. if that doesn't stop -- you know, again, because it has not stopped, that is something else that has led us to where we are now, and that's something else plays and a big way in my stories. alexei, by stories in the desert rock and explore this question . it is a place. the fuel the american dreams. freer killing off the space, or is the lead is? >> thank you. >> well, my main reason that i hope people will read this chandra of books and my book in particular , i really tried .. and loads of cash with cocaine on them. the mothers are doing drugs and the moms are physically present but they're not emotionally present. you will end up with the kid who may or may not go out and hurt other people. even though when the karen's really do care and make wrong decisions or they don't keep their eyes open because they are victims themselves. they can try as hard as they can. it's tough but it seems that the parent does play an important role in these cases. >> thank you all very much and thank you all for joining us. [applause]
that things will be okay. don't try to control your environment, that is not going to work, whether you have a higher power concept, prayer can be helpful, faith number one. number two, hope, do not lose hope. this is going to get better, we are taking care of things as the president assured he would and there's hope for the future. finally and most importantly, important relationships, important people in our lives need to be kept close and think in terms of regulating our emotions by using other people. proximity and intimacy of others is exceedingly important at times like this. >> dr. drew, what you're saying there, the two things that are intangible, faith, believing in things unseen, hope, hoping the sun will be out tomorrow, and also relationships with other people. times like this, even for myself, sometimes when you're overwhelmed with issues like this, the last thing you want to do is be with someone else, you want to be by yourself and get through the emotion on your own. >> right. it's -- i would resist isolating. to sit and be calm and be sort and be calm with nature is fine but
to go and -- to go into a morbid environment. he had enough to think about. so yes, she wrote letters. she didn't have many friends, unfortunately. but she did have this wonderful family who kept her going and there always seemed to be somebody there. as far as reading, i don't think she did very much which was a shame because she was a very intellectual woman, highly educated. that intellect and that wonderful education seemed wasted in some ways. >> next question comes from bonnie who is watching us in cincinnati. hi, bonnie, you're on the air. >> hi. thank you for taking my call. this is a most intriguing subject. i do collect albums from the 1840's and 1850's of the central united states. and i do own a journal that was written by a family member of william henry harrison. the harrison family coming from cincinnati. after his death, frequently the letters that do i have, i'm not a member of that family, however i do have several of the letters and albums hand written, journals, and frequently similar to mrs. pierce, in the older women, elders of the family, there is the serious co
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